Princess Cornflakes

Too trashy to print on a cereal box

Archive for June 2006

look at mother nature on the run

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Well, I dreamed I saw the silver spaceships flying
In the yellow haze of the sun
There were children crying and colors flying
All around the chosen ones
All in a dream, all in a dream
The loading had begun
Flyin’ mother nature’s silver seed
To a new home in the sun
Flyin’ mother nature’s silver seed
To a new home in the sun

After the Gold Rush, Neil Young.

If mother nature was on the run in the 1970’s, she is long gone by now. That’s quite clear given the pollution all around us, the heat that seems to increase every year, and the frequency of disasters. OK. I haven’t seen An Inconvenient Truth yet. I’ve only seen the trailer. Yet, that was enough to horrify me and make me feel sick to be in this world where we’re spending so much money every day on The Ever Present War, which will never end, never improve things, and can never truly even be explained. Why are we fighting this war? Because one man, George Bush, felt a mysterious need to. And to fight this war, he needs lots and lots of money, which I must pay. God, it’s really really depressing. I am paying lots of money to fund a war I don’t agree with, never wanted, and the man who started it cares nothing about the issues I care about.

Why, as Gore states, have recent summers been so hot? Why are hurricanes reaching all-time intensities? Bush doesn’t want to address those questions. In fact, he never even mentions Hurricane Katrina anymore. It’s as if “9/11” is the only disaster that ever occured, the only thing Americans ought to remember and feel. Why can’t we just leave Iraq, Iran, Israel, Palestine, and all of those nations to thier own devices and consider what is happening to us at home, and start setting a better example for the world?

Americans are not taking care of our country. We are making stupid decisions which we can afford not to make, in order to live outdated lifestyles which aren’t even all that comfortable. We should not be sitting in long lines of cars driving out to suburban mini-mansions. We should live in small, easy to clean condos in densely developed areas with good train and bus systems. Has anyone ever tried living in a place that had good transit? It’s a luxury. The biggest SUV with the best AC could never compare being whisked around on a train while reading or enjoying the scenery. And we should not be drinking from disposible water bottles. We should either drink the tap water, or use sink filter and refill bottles. Shame on you Poland Spring drinkers! Those stupid bottles litter the sides of the road. They are an eyesore. Water is a natural resource. Why do we need to add plastic? There are many other things we need to change. Perhaps I will start compiling a weekly list. Bike trails would be a quick addition.

Anyway, I’m feeling politically depressed today, especially thinking about the war and all the SUV’s. I wish I could climb onto a silver spaceship and travel to a “new home in the sun” with all the sensible people, or travel into the computer and live permanently in cyberspace, but I guess I’m stuck here for the ride.

Heather

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Written by nattie

June 17, 2006 at 4:10 am

Posted in editorial

On Tony Smith

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I posted that mainly because I myself enjoy the experience of driving on the Turnpike, past the futuristic concrete refineries and smokestacks. It is dramatic, a monument to the fossil-fuel era. Perhaps someday the Turnpike will be a ruin. It is also reality, which is always beautiful. I’d rather be there than some brand-new home development which tries to give the impression it is out in the country.

Written by nattie

June 9, 2006 at 1:33 am

Posted in editorial

Tony Smith’s turnpike

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Now that I live in New Jersey (exit 9), I am reminded of some art essays I read in college. In 1966, modernist sculptor Tony Smith described a ride on the then-unfinished turnpike for an ArtForum interview in 1966:

“I view art as something vast. I think highway systems fall down because they are not art. Art today is the art of postage stamps. […] I think of art in a public context and not in terms of mobility of works of art. Art is just there[…].
When I was teaching at Cooper Union in the first year or two of the fifties, someone told me how I could get on the unfinished New Jersey Turnpike. I took three students and drove from somewhere in the Meadows to New Brunswick. It was a dark night and there were no lights or shoulder markers, linke railings, or anything at all except the dark pavement moving through the towers, fumes and colored lights. This drive was a revealing experience. The road and the landscape was artificial, and yet it couldn’t be called a work of art. On the other hand, it did something for me that art had never done. At first I didn’t know what it was, but it’s effect was to liberate me from many of the views I had had about art. It seemed that there had been a reality there which had not had any expression in art.

The experience on the road was something mapped out but not socially recognized. I thought to myself, it ought to be clear that’s the end of art. Most painting looks pretty pictorial after that. There is no way you can frame it, you just have to experience it. Later I discovered some abandoned airstrips in Europe – abandoned works, Surrealist landscapes, something that had nothing to do with any function, created worlds without tradition. Artificial landscape without cultural precedent began to dawn on me. There is a drill ground in Nuremberg, large enough to accomodate two million men. The entire field is enclosed with high embankements and towers. The concrete approach is three sixteen-inch steps, one above the other, stretching for a mile or so[…]

Written by nattie

June 5, 2006 at 4:15 am

Posted in editorial